When Should YOU Claim Social Security?

Social Security is available from the time we turn 62 years old.  But there is a penalty for taking it before our full retirement age–the payment is lowered.  And there is a benefit for taking it later than our full retirement age–the payment increases for every year we defer until age 70.  There is no reason to defer past 70.

For most of my readers, your full retirement age is 67.  For those born between 1938 and 1959, your full retirement age is between 65 and 67.  For those born before 1938, your full retirement age is 65.

Conventional wisdom says if you are in good health, you should wait until age 70 to claim Social Security because that maximizes your payment.  The payment grows 8% per year from your full retirement age until 70.  8% sounds like an amazing increase until you realize you are trading twelve months of payments for that increase.

And conventional wisdom assumes you are living paycheck to paycheck.  You get your Social Security and you spend your Social Security.

If that’s your situation, then you’ll claim it when you need it to pay your bills and put food on your table.

But I suspect many of my readers are in our situation:  We will have other resources available to pay our bills.  We will claim Social Security so we optimize our long-term finances. Continue reading “When Should YOU Claim Social Security?”

Could You Live On Social Security Alone?

The experts say Social Security provides about 40% of the typical retiree’s pre-retirement earnings.

But that percentage varies a lot.  Lower earners receive a higher percentage of their earnings and higher earners receive a lower percentage of their earnings.

I write a lot about the importance of saving money for retirement because of this 40% statistic.  But COULD I live on my social security alone?  If I could, what would that life look like? Continue reading “Could You Live On Social Security Alone?”

How Are YOU Doing On Your Path To Retirement?

I’ve written a lot about my path to retirement.  The savings rates it took to retire at 51 and the choices we made.

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I’ve also stressed that everyone’s retirement path is different.  We each have to find the path that works for us.

I found a great resource that can help you figure out how much you need to save, what savings milestones you should have reached at certain ages, where your retirement income will come from and how to make your retirement savings last.  Fidelity Investments released a series of articles that will help guide you on your path.

How much should you save for retirement?  They say 15% of your annual income.  This includes your contributions + any employer match you receive.  This savings is for retirement only–any other savings goals would be in addition to this 15%. Continue reading “How Are YOU Doing On Your Path To Retirement?”

Social (in)Security is Complicated!

Many of my younger readers think they will not receive Social Security.  This is because the trust funds are predicted to be exhausted sometime around 2034.

There are many reasons the government will not allow Social Security to disappear.  Social Security payments keep about 35% of older Americans out of poverty and is the principle source of income for nearly half of this group.  It simply cannot go away without destabilizing our country.  Oh, and old people vote so it will never happen.

But things will definitely have to change. 

Continue reading “Social (in)Security is Complicated!”