Your Retirement Questions Answered

When people find out I write a financial independence/early retirement blog, they sometimes take a breath and start peppering me with questions.  I thought it may be helpful to y’all if I answer the questions I get asked most often.

How much should I contribute to my retirement?

If you want to retire at a typical age then 15% of your gross salary before taxes and benefits.  This 15% can include your company match.

At my last job, the company matched 25% of my contributions up to 6% of my salary so that worked out to a 1.5% total match.  If I wanted to retire around my full retirement age for Social Security, then I should have contributed 13.5% of my money.

If you want to retire early, you should be contributing 15% to your retirement and saving outside of your retirement accounts as well.  How much depends on your expenses and risk profile.  Run a few calculators, or build a spreadsheet and figure it out.  Here’s a calculator from Vanguard.

What if I started late or don’t have much saved now? Continue reading “Your Retirement Questions Answered”

How I’ll Fund My Retirement

Many of the financial bloggers I follow are pursuing financial independence.  Not many of them are already there.  So there isn’t much information about how to fund your life once you are retired.

My fellow blogger, Fritz, at RetirementManifesto decided to correct that by creating a chain of articles discussing drawdown strategies.

I decided to join in the fun and lay out my draw down strategy.

I don’t have a pension.  I am counting on Social Security though I’ve reduced my expected payments by 30% because something has to change with Social Security, right?  At 52, with a husband in his 60’s (sorry Mr. Ms. Liz!) I feel secure in counting on this.

Curious about how I got here?  Here’s my savings rate and net worth growth.

First, a couple snapshots on where I am now.  I’m following Fritz’s lead on format. Continue reading “How I’ll Fund My Retirement”

How Much Is Enough?

When you get to your 50’s and 60’s, thoughts turn to retirement.

Since we’re among the first of our friends to take the leap, we’re having a bunch of fun conversations.  Friends are trying to figure out when they can join us.

Mr. Ms. Liz tells them to do it sooner than later.

My friends think I’m crazy but one of the big reasons I retired early is that Mr. Ms. Liz’s Mom died at 64.  Mr. Ms. Liz just turned 61.

If he were to follow in his Mom’s footsteps, we have three more years.  There are a slew of reasons why this won’t happen (smoker, non-exerciser, poor eater etc.) but it was on my mind.  If we have three more years, I want them to be three years focused on FUN, not three years focused on work.  And we were ready–financially and emotionally.

You don’t know how many good years you have left.  We know few people who have a great quality of life after 75.  So we say make it happen sooner if you can. Continue reading “How Much Is Enough?”

Let’s Make A Deal

I went to a (early!) retirement party for a friend and former colleague of mine this week.  Yay Phil!  It was so fun to catch up with my old work buddies who were there.

Knowing that Mr. Ms. Liz and I are fairly knowledgeable about things financial, one former colleague confessed that he spends about $4,000 a year going out to lunch.

If you read last week’s post, you know that if you LOVE going out to lunch and it completely enhances your world,  you should go out to lunch and enjoy every minute and every morsel.  (So long as you don’t have consumer debt like credit cards and you are saving at least 15% of your income for your retirement).

But he was making this confession because going out to lunch doesn’t completely enhance his world, it just makes life a bit more convenient.

He thinks $4,000 a year is too much money.  Yep, it would be too much money for me too. Continue reading “Let’s Make A Deal”