You Should Leave A Job With More Than Just Memories

When I retired, I rolled my 401k balances over to IRA accounts with Vanguard.

My company’s 401k plan was a good one.  They even offered my favorite Vanguard fund (VTSAX). But all 401k plans have fees in addition to the underlying fees of the funds where the money is actually invested.  This is because of the reporting requirements, paperwork and account holder support that 401k funds provide.  Those services cost money so each quarter I’d see some of my money disappearing to pay those fees.

With Vanguard, I pay the underlying fees of the funds and nothing else.

Converting my account was easy.  They even assigned an account rep. who monitored the transition and kept me updated on its progress.

I think the account rep. thought I was crazy. Continue reading “You Should Leave A Job With More Than Just Memories”

It’s Not Always Smart To Do The “Smart” Thing

It is typically recommended that we purchase insurance for catastrophic, infrequent events and we self insure for everything else.

So we should insure our lives and our ability to work if people depend on our income with life and disability insurance, our home because its loss would be difficult to recover from with homeowner’s insurance, our cars because the damage we can do to others is enormous with auto insurance, and our other assets if they are significant with an umbrella policy.

But we should not insure things that are relatively easy to replace or dollar amounts that are small relative to our net worth.

Using that rule, it would not make sense to insure my wedding ring.  While it is valuable to me, it isn’t valuable compared to our overall net worth.  It was when we got engaged but it isn’t now.  For $35 to $50 in premium each year, we’ve had the peace of mind that comes from not worrying about replacing my ring.  We’ve paid that premium for 28 years.  We filed a claim once and may be filing another claim Monday. Continue reading “It’s Not Always Smart To Do The “Smart” Thing”

If You Can Only Do One Thing

Life is busy, I get it.  The last thing you need is one more thing on your to do list.

Mastering your finances seems really time consuming and complicated.  I tried to simplify it as much as I could for you but it ended up being 12 steps to a kick a$$ life.  And those 12 steps didn’t include some really important things that help us move through the steps more quickly like figuring out your why and tracking your net worth.  And it didn’t include things like making a will and getting life insurance which are critical if anyone depends on your income or in-home work.

If I had to pick one thing to have everyone do (after getting life insurance*) it would be to calculate your net worth.  Your net worth is like a business’s balance sheet.  What you own minus what you owe.  Calculating my net worth kept my eye on the prize and was my secret weapon to achieving early retirement.  Once you start tracking it, your mind automatically thinks differently about earning and spending decisions–you want your net worth to go up each month.

Net Worth = What I Own – What I Owe Continue reading “If You Can Only Do One Thing”

What Is Weighing You Down?

I wrote this a couple months ago–I wish we had 10″ of snow today, that would be super fun.  I woke up this morning thinking about what was weighing me down and decided to put this out into the world.

We were blanketed by 10″ of snow today.  We live 30 minutes from world class ski areas but are in a banana belt where we get much less snow and big storms like this are not that common.  After shoveling the driveway, we grabbed some friends and went cross country skiing on our local golf course.

It was warm and the snow was wet; it was sticking to the middle part of my ski.  It’s pretty hard to glide on a ski when you have a heavy lump of snow underfoot.

This is how life is.  In life, we can’t get where we want when something is weighing us down.  I came up with several ways to get rid of the snow.  Each sort of worked but none worked great. Continue reading “What Is Weighing You Down?”

Yikes–I Went Back To Work!

Almost universally, when I talk about being retired, people say “but you’ll go back to work someday–right?”  I’ve been asking some close friends about this.  Why are people trying so hard to un-retire me?  Are people more comfortable with me if I have a lifestyle similar to theirs?  Well, I guess I’m going to make those folks a bit more comfortable.

I’m adding a word to my title–I’m now Semi-Retired.  I’m an accidental Semi-Retiree.

I guess I’ve been a Semi-Retiree since I started this blog in July.  The blog is work–right?  But I made $20 on the blog last year, and I spent over $3,000.  Most of it was to attend a financial bloggers conference (yep, that exists).  But over $600 was for hosting and software.  So I guess this blog is the worst part-time job ever–but I love it.  And my readership is growing and someday it may make a few dollars (in case the IRS is reading this). Continue reading “Yikes–I Went Back To Work!”

Turn A Treat Back Into A Treat

When something is scarce, we value it more.

Our water was shut off the other day so a leak could be fixed in front of our desert home.  Fortunately, Mr. Ms. Liz saw the plumbers coming and filled a bucket with water.  I can wash my hands in about 4 ounces of water when water is scarce.  When water isn’t scarce, it takes at least four times that much.

I love sweets–chocolate, sour sugary, chewy caramel–all of them.  My Mom was a dental hygienist and didn’t want sugar on our teeth so there were no sweets in my home; even the table sugar was hidden.  This turned me into a great sweet sleuth (with only one cavity) but also made me enjoy every morsel of any sweet.  Each year, my brother and I were given the Russell Stover four pack chocolates in our Christmas stockings.  I remember stretching those four chocolates out over the day, paying close attention to each bite and each flavor.  Last night I ate four blueberry/dark chocolate squares almost without a thought. Continue reading “Turn A Treat Back Into A Treat”