The Joy of Working . . . When Working Is a Choice

The job I retired from was with a terrific company.  I spent 17 years working with some of my best friends and even my fake kid.

Each year, the CFO would gather her leadership group–the accounting, HR and IT professionals who reported to her for a “Summit”.  A gathering to share knowledge, communicate updates and, frankly, to spend some time wining, dining and team building.  Attending these Summits was always a highlight in my year–a paid vacation with my buddies.

I retired 14 months ago.  But this year, I was asked to attend the summit.  And wait, it gets better.  I was asked to ***geek alert*** present a short class on one of my favorite subjects–Excel.

Initially, I was both terrified and thrilled.  Terrified because I HATE public speaking.  My hope was that my short speech at my retirement party would be my last.  Thrilled because it was an incredible honor to be asked to return.  I was excited to see my former colleagues and I love teaching people about Excel.  Helping people with Excel was my favorite thing about my old job.

I got over my terror by convincing myself I’d just be sitting at a table behind my laptop screen.  And I was–it didn’t end up being scary once I got started.  It helped that the room was filled with my friends.

It was really invigorating.  The group was super excited to learn new tips and make their processes more efficient.  There was more than one “wow” comment while I was presenting.  How often does that happen?!

And I was asked to stay over–in a beautiful resort and join the group for dinner and shenanigans after my session.  The shenanigans included sake bombs that sent more than one person stumbling back to their room–thankfully, not me.

Oh, and I got paid to do this!  It will help me fund my IRA this year.

I spent a ton of time preparing.  I developed an agenda that allowed both novices and experts to walk away with a couple new tips.  And being ultra prepared helped me get over my fear.  It was so worth it!

If I thought I had to take this on because I needed the money, my fear of public speaking would have been more than a bit paralyzing.  I would have resented the amount of time it took to prepare–especially because I spent way more time on this than I could bill.  Since it was a choice, I could focus on my excitement.

Not needing the money transformed the way I thought about the entire situation.

There are more benefits to being financially independent than I ever expected. 

I expected my financial independence would mean I could replace work with fun activities.  And, yes, I have.

I didn’t really think about being able to pick and choose money-making opportunities based on whether I thought they would be fun.

Last week was a perfect example.  Hanging out with my old friends, making some new friends and being able to contribute again was a rush.  Having people thank me and tell me how they would use what they learned to improve their processes was incredibly rewarding.

Oh and at least one of them wants to hire me to help them one on one.  That sounds fun, so I’ll do it!

But even before I quit my job, my financial independence paid dividends.  My boss was doing everything he could to keep me around.  This gave me a lot more control–I took advantage of it by working from our desert home as much as I felt comfortable.

So I’d say whether you want to retire early or not, save your money.  Save a lot of money.  Save as if you were pursuing financial independence.  The rewards go beyond the ability to replace work with fun–and that’s pretty awesome on its own!

Introducing the FIRE Prowess Score

Once again, I’m adding a link to a blogging chain.

The last chain was a series of articles about drawdown strategies.  A group of bloggers detailed out how they expected to support themselves when their paychecks stopped.  It was a fun exercise and it forced me to get more specific about where my money will come from in different market conditions.

The latest chain is a new way to assess our efficiency at reaching financial independence.  The FIRE (Financial Independence/Retire Early) Prowess Score was developed by JW, the 30 something behind The Green Swan, it goes like this:

FIRE Prowess Score= Change in Net Worth / Total Gross Income

His goal was to develop a measurement that worked across all income levels so geeky bloggers (watch me raise my hand!) could compare themselves on an even playing field.  The typical measurement we’ve used is savings rates.

The downfall of savings rates is that it’s easier to save 75% of your income if you make $500,000 a year than if you make $50,000 a year.  The savings rate super heroes in this space are often doctors.

I love that this is called a prowess score.  Prowess means skill or expertise in a particular field.  Yep that makes sense.  But it also means bravery or courage–and I think it truly takes some courage to rock this FIRE Prowess Score.  You have to live differently than those around you.  You have to focus your limited resources on things that matter to you and ignore the things that don’t.  That takes some courage for sure.

OK so how does it work?  Let’s say you are calculating your FIRE Prowess Score for the last 5 years:

-Add your income for those five years–I got my historic income from SSA.gov
-Take your current net worth and subtract your net worth from 5 years ago
-Divide your change in net worth into your total income
=And you have your FIRE Prowess Score

Here’s an example:

5 year increase in net worth: $100,000
/ Income 5 years @ 75,000/year = $375,000
=FIRE Prowess score of .27

JW gave us descriptions for the different score levels so we can pat ourselves on the back or berate ourselves to do better:

If over the last 5 years your FIRE Prowess is:

  • Negative or 0.0x – Not even on the path toward retirement, let alone FIRE. If you aren’t saving and investing any money and your net worth isn’t growing then it is time to make some changes and develop positive financial habits. It may be a change to a frugal lifestyle or getting an advance degree to take the next step in your career.
  • 0.0x to 0.25x – You’re conscious of your retirement and know you should plan for it, but early retirement may not be on your radar at this point.
  • .25x to 0.50x – You’ve got the ball rolling and you’re certainly trying! Keep investing wisely, perhaps add a side-hustle or few lifestyle tweaks to lower expenses and FIRE can be within your grasp.
  • .50x to 0.75x – You’re working hard toward your retirement goals! Early retirement is definitely possible. Keep working hard and that investment snowball will be rolling (compounding) in no time!
  • .75x to 1.0x – FIRE is on your mind and you are performing in overdrive right now!
  • 1.0x and over – You are killing it! Don’t make any stupid mistakes and FIRE will be within your grasp in no time. In this scenario, your net worth is more than your lifetime earnings which Joe at Retire By 40 recently wrote about. This is certainly a tough milestone to reach, but maybe one day I can make this claim!

OK so drum roll please . . . here are my scores:

2016:  2.79 off the charts!
5 Years 2012-2016:  1.34  I’m killing it!
10 Years 2007-2016:  .89  not too shabby!
Post College:  .72  it took me some time to get this FIRE thing going.
Worst Year:  -1.34 in 2008 when my net worth shrunk 16%

How did I rock it so much in 2016 you may ask?  I quit my freaking job!  I had a full year of growth in net worth against a bit more than half a year of income.  We may need to come up with a different scoring system for those at the end of their accumulation phase (that’s just a nice way to say older folks).

As long as the stock market cooperates, I’m really going to rock it this year.  My net worth continues to grow and my income is almost non existent.  So far my FIRE Prowess Score is 20.97 for 2017.  Oh shucks, JW said this score doesn’t work for folks who aren’t working . . .

I think JW’s descriptions are spot on.  I would say over my lifetime I’ve been focused on saving for retirement but I didn’t put my savings into overdrive until my last 10 working years.  I also made some investing mistakes early on–thinking I was some sort of Warrenita Buffett rather than just shoveling money into a S&P 500 index fund.

Check out the other bloggers’ scores in the chain:

Calculate your FIRE Prowess Score whether you’re pursuing early retirement or not.

What can you do to improve it?  Save more of your income and invest it smarter–show your prowess!

How Much Is Enough?

When you get to your 50’s and 60’s, thoughts turn to retirement.

Since we’re among the first of our friends to take the leap, we’re having a bunch of fun conversations.  Friends are trying to figure out when they can join us.

Mr. Ms. Liz tells them to do it sooner than later.

My friends think I’m crazy but one of the big reasons I retired early is that Mr. Ms. Liz’s Mom died at 64.  Mr. Ms. Liz just turned 61.

If he were to follow in his Mom’s footsteps, we have three more years.  There are a slew of reasons why this won’t happen (smoker, non-exerciser, poor eater etc.) but it was on my mind.  If we have three more years, I want them to be three years focused on FUN, not three years focused on work.  And we were ready–financially and emotionally.

You don’t know how many good years you have left.  We know few people who have a great quality of life after 75.  So we say make it happen sooner if you can. Continue reading “How Much Is Enough?”

Save To Retire Early Even If You Won’t

I listened to a good bit of the James Comey hearing last week.  I don’t follow politics closely but Mr. Ms. Liz does so it was on the TV while I was working.

I kept wondering–does he have F U money?

We haven’t talked about F U money before because I find it to be a bit vulgar and I know some of my readers are sensitive to such things.  But I haven’t found a better way to express this concept.

Jim Collins, one of my personal finance heroes, coined the term.  If you haven’t read his stock series yet, do it right after you finish this insightful post :).

Does James Comey have enough money to move on to something else without worrying about how he will keep his family afloat during the interim?  He’s 56, could he retire? Continue reading “Save To Retire Early Even If You Won’t”

What Could You Do With A Million Dollars?

On the Stacking Benjamins Podcast I was listening to today, Joe was talking about the responses he received when he asked his Twitter followers what they would do with a million dollars.

He got some interesting responses.  Some were altruistic–donating the money or helping family members.  Some were realistic–like paying off debt.  And some were funny–like calculating the time it would take to count the money at the bank–in twenties.

It got me thinking.  What could each of us do with a million dollars?

I’m overly rational so I got out the calculator.  $1,000,000 invested should provide $40,000 of retirement income forever.  With Social Security providing 40% of our needs (as it does for the average recipient), we should have a stream of income of about $67,000 in retirement.  I could live a pretty nice life on $67,000.

That $1,000,000 invested in rental real estate should provide even more income.  According to Paula at affordanything.com, we shouldn’t invest in a property unless it will rent for 12% of the purchase costs per year, 6% of that goes to costs and that leaves 6% return for us.  Our retiree now has an annual stream of income of $100,000 including Social Security.

Now we’re talkin’!  With that income, we could do some really cool altruistic stuff too! Continue reading “What Could You Do With A Million Dollars?”

You Should Leave A Job With More Than Just Memories

When I retired, I rolled my 401k balances over to IRA accounts with Vanguard.

My company’s 401k plan was a good one.  They even offered my favorite Vanguard fund (VTSAX). But all 401k plans have fees in addition to the underlying fees of the funds where the money is actually invested.  This is because of the reporting requirements, paperwork and account holder support that 401k funds provide.  Those services cost money so each quarter I’d see some of my money disappearing to pay those fees.

With Vanguard, I pay the underlying fees of the funds and nothing else.

Converting my account was easy.  They even assigned an account rep. who monitored the transition and kept me updated on its progress.

I think the account rep. thought I was crazy. Continue reading “You Should Leave A Job With More Than Just Memories”

If You Can Only Do One Thing

Life is busy, I get it.  The last thing you need is one more thing on your to do list.

Mastering your finances seems really time consuming and complicated.  I tried to simplify it as much as I could for you but it ended up being 12 steps to a kick a$$ life.  And those 12 steps didn’t include some really important things that help us move through the steps more quickly like figuring out your why and tracking your net worth.  And it didn’t include things like making a will and getting life insurance which are critical if anyone depends on your income or in-home work.

If I had to pick one thing to have everyone do (after getting life insurance*) it would be to calculate your net worth.  Your net worth is like a business’s balance sheet.  What you own minus what you owe.  Calculating my net worth kept my eye on the prize and was my secret weapon to achieving early retirement.  Once you start tracking it, your mind automatically thinks differently about earning and spending decisions–you want your net worth to go up each month.

Net Worth = What I Own – What I Owe Continue reading “If You Can Only Do One Thing”

How Are YOU Doing On Your Path To Retirement?

I’ve written a lot about my path to retirement.  The savings rates it took to retire at 51 and the choices we made.

savings-rate-nw-accum2

I’ve also stressed that everyone’s retirement path is different.  We each have to find the path that works for us.

I found a great resource that can help you figure out how much you need to save, what savings milestones you should have reached at certain ages, where your retirement income will come from and how to make your retirement savings last.  Fidelity Investments released a series of articles that will help guide you on your path.

How much should you save for retirement?  They say 15% of your annual income.  This includes your contributions + any employer match you receive.  This savings is for retirement only–any other savings goals would be in addition to this 15%. Continue reading “How Are YOU Doing On Your Path To Retirement?”

Planning For Retirement?

I had a pretty basic long-term financial calculator for over a decade before I retired.  Building and updating this model helped me stay focused on making smart choices about spending and creating wealth.

I called it retire_soon.xls.  It was so old, you couldn’t have spaces in file names when it was created.  It worked fine as an estimate but wasn’t something I was comfortable basing my quit no-quit decision on.  Though it said quit!

Then my company’s 401k plan introduced a calculator that could tell me whether my finances looked rainy 🙁 or sunny 🙂  It said quit!  But it was like the wizard behind the curtain–I couldn’t control (or even know) what assumptions were being used for inflation, investment returns, social security adjustments etc.  I couldn’t adjust my spending assumptions down as I aged.  I couldn’t vary my investment returns by year–the S&P doesn’t just march along at the same rate each year. Continue reading “Planning For Retirement?”

You Gotta Figure Out Your Why

My WHY is up top.  I wanted to be playing in the desert in January . . . . and February, March, April, November and December.

I live in the Colorado mountains 30 minutes away from world class skiing.  It’s an amazing place to make a life if you can make a living and we made a great living and life there.  But here’s the thing about living 30 minutes away from world class skiing: Continue reading “You Gotta Figure Out Your Why”